Toby's Ramblings http://tosbourn.com The personal blog of Toby Osbourn Thu, 22 Jan 2015 23:49:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 My highlights from On the Shortness of Life by Seneca http://tosbourn.com/highlights-shortness-life-seneca/ http://tosbourn.com/highlights-shortness-life-seneca/#comments Thu, 22 Jan 2015 23:49:05 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2505 I have recently finished reading Seneca’s essays collected into the book On the Shortness of Life. This is the first book related to stoicism I have read, I would like to read more. I wanted to share some of the highlights I made whilst reading the book, if I am honest mainly for myself when […]

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I have recently finished reading Seneca’s essays collected into the book On the Shortness of Life.

This is the first book related to stoicism I have read, I would like to read more.

I wanted to share some of the highlights I made whilst reading the book, if I am honest mainly for myself when I come to want to refresh my memory on parts but you may find them useful too!

So you must not think a man has lived long because he has white hair and wrinkles: he has not lived long, just existed long.

I like the idea of basing length of life on the quality of the life not the years.

Meanwhile death will arrive, and you have no choice in making yourself available for that.

Again this was around the idea of not being idle and having a worthwhile quality of life.

The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy, which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today.

Seneca seems to be the master of one liners like this.

So it is inevitable that life will be not just very short but very miserable for those who acquire by great toil what they must keep by greater toil.

I love the idea of things like possessions ending up being a burden on you.

since the luxury of the times has reached the point where an exile’s allowance is more than the inheritance of leading men of old.

A reminder of how easy we have it these days.

long association brings love of evil as well as good.

My takeaway from this is how bad habits can easily form if you do them repeatedly.

Let no one rob me of a single day who is not going to make me an adequate return for such a loss.

Spending your time wisely.

So if you must fill your time, write something in a simple style for your own use and not for publication

There is a lot of stuff in the essays around not relying on others, I think this makes a lot of sense.

I imagine many people could have achieved wisdom if they had not imagined they had already achieved it

Always be learning!

Above all it is essential to appraise oneself, because we usually overestimate our capabilities.

Pretty self explanatory

You must reflect that fettered prisoners only at first feel the weight of the shackles on their legs: in time, when they have decided not to struggle against but to bear them, they learn from necessity to endure with fortitude, and from habit to endure with ease.

A reminder that whilst bad habits can easily form over time, so can good ones.

all life is a servitude.

I liked this as a little sort of mantra, everyone serves someone or the things they own.

He who fears death will never do anything worthy of a living man.

Another quote about having a good quality of life and living in the moment more.

Know, then, that every condition can change, and whatever happens to anyone can happen to you too.

How we shouldn’t try and be shaped by fortune because things can and do change, we see it all the time yet we don’t expect it to happen to us.

So we should make light of all things and endure them with tolerance: it is more civilized to make fun of life than to bewail it.

I love this line.

However, the two things must be mingled and varied, solitude and joining a crowd: the one will make us long for people and the other for ourselves, and each will be a remedy for the other; solitude will cure our distaste for a crowd, and a crowd will cure our boredom with solitude.

I spend way too much time in solitude, I should try and vary this some.

Our minds must relax: they will rise better and keener after a rest.

Couldn’t be quoted enough!

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The correct way to markup an image and caption in HTML http://tosbourn.com/correct-way-markup-image-caption-html/ http://tosbourn.com/correct-way-markup-image-caption-html/#comments Tue, 20 Jan 2015 19:22:19 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2500 I my recent post about quick semantic wins I mentioned that captioning an image should be done with <figure> and <figcaption> I wanted to explain it in a bit more detail with a quick example. <figure> <img src="http://placekitten.com/200/300" alt="Small picture of a kitten" /> <figcaption> Small picture of a kitten, graciously shared by <a href="http://placekitten.com">placekitten.com</a> […]

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I my recent post about quick semantic wins I mentioned that captioning an image should be done with <figure> and <figcaption>

I wanted to explain it in a bit more detail with a quick example.

<figure>
 <img src="http://placekitten.com/200/300" alt="Small picture of a kitten" />
 <figcaption>
 Small picture of a kitten, graciously shared by <a href="http://placekitten.com">placekitten.com</a>
 </figcaption>
</figure>

Here is a gist of it, if you like that sort of thing!

So what we have is a <figure> element which holds both an <img> and a <figcaption> element.

The implied meaning here is that the contents of <figcaption> caption the rest of the contents of <figure> which in this case is an <img>, but it could have been a video file or tabular information – anything that constitutes something that could be captioned really.

The other thing you may notice is that I have included a link inside <figcaption>, this is because <figcaption> is a block level element and can have elements inside itself. As well as links a common thing you might find would be <cite>.

I was happy to note that WordPress gets this right out of the box. I have seen other CMS incorrectly use spans and divs to accomplish this but WordPress leads the way when it comes to marking up captioned images correctly!

Why should I care?

You might rightly wonder why you would care about correctly captioning images. There are several reasons.

  • Not all images make sense by themselves – You can’t assume everyone is going to understand your image, adding a caption provides much needed context.
  • More content for you – If you supplement your images with correct captions you are adding extra contextual information for your users but likewise you are adding more content for search engines to find.
  • Captions can be translated by software, images can’t – Which immediately opens up your images to being understand by an international audience.
  • It is professional – You expect journals, books and magazines to correctly caption their images, why shouldn’t people expect it from your website?
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View Markdown Files in your Terminal http://tosbourn.com/view-markdown-files-terminal/ http://tosbourn.com/view-markdown-files-terminal/#comments Tue, 20 Jan 2015 12:43:51 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2498 I spend all day in my terminal and for better or worse I deal with a lot of Markdown files throughout the day. One thing I often find myself needing to do is preview or read a markdown file, a lot of the time this could be a README.md for a project I am coming […]

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I spend all day in my terminal and for better or worse I deal with a lot of Markdown files throughout the day.

One thing I often find myself needing to do is preview or read a markdown file, a lot of the time this could be a README.md for a project I am coming back to or maybe a blog post that is sitting in draft somewhere.

I decided to write a very quick function that would facilitate previewing Markdown files in the terminal. I wanted to share this because I am sure this annoys more than just me!

There are two programs I am using to help me do this.

The first is Pandoc, which is great at taking things like Markdown and changing it into something else (say, HTML).

The second is Lynx, which is a text based web browser that you can run in your terminal.

Installing Pandoc and Lynx

On OS X I would recommend installing these using homebrew.

brew install pandoc

brew install lynx

If you are running Linux, your package manager of choice should have them.

Setting up the script

Once you have these installed the helper function we need to join them together is very simple.

Open up ~/.profile or whatever text file you like using for your terminal preferences and paste the following;

rmd () {
  pandoc $1 | lynx -stdin
}

What this does is defines a function called rmd (Read Markdown) and in the body of the function it tells Pandoc to read in whatever file you have specified and pass this to lynx which will be listening for standard input.

Once you have this in and have saved your file you will need to run source ~/.profile (or whatever file you edited).

Usage

To use this just call rmd path/to/markdowndown/file.md and it will open up as a webpage in Lynx.

To quit out of Lynx just press q and you will be back to your terminal.

Because Lynx is a fully fledged browser you can follow links in the markdown file and interact just like you would if you were viewing it in your normal browser.

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Some stumbling blocks I hit following my first Swift tutorial http://tosbourn.com/stumbling-blocks-hit-following-first-swift-tutorial/ http://tosbourn.com/stumbling-blocks-hit-following-first-swift-tutorial/#comments Mon, 19 Jan 2015 19:57:11 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2492 I am trying to pick up some Swift to help me with a project I want to work on so I figured I would dive in with a basic tutorial to get my feet wet in the language and remember what Xcode looks like. I decided to follow this tutorial – the purpose of which […]

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I am trying to pick up some Swift to help me with a project I want to work on so I figured I would dive in with a basic tutorial to get my feet wet in the language and remember what Xcode looks like.

I decided to follow this tutorial – the purpose of which was to build a really basic table that would get data in from your controller.

Even though the tutorial covered everything you needed to get by, there have been a few changes to how Swift works since it was written and also a few things they take for granted (like you knowing where certain views are inside of Xcode).

The first two stumbling block I hit was that once I opened a storyboard file I didn’t know how to open the object library. When I searched for it the screenshots I found were from older versions of Xcode.

The blue icon showing that the object library has been selected in Xcode
The blue icon showing that the object library has been selected in Xcode

The next problem I faced was that once I had my table inside of my view I was told;

Now we need to set up a delegate and data source for the table view. This is easy to do in interface builder. Just hold control, and then click and drag from the tableview to the “View Controller” object in your storyboard’s hierarchy, and select ‘data source’. Repeat with the ‘delegate’ options.

I could not find this storyboard hierarchy to save my life! Some more searching and I found what I needed, for reference it is this little black icon.

Icon to see the storyboard hierarchy
Icon to see the storyboard hierarchy

Now with my Xcode woes out of the way I was able to down to actually typing some code (as a vim user all this clicking and dragging was very disturbing!)

The code we were expected to have in our completed viewController file was;

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController, UITableViewDataSource, UITableViewDelegate {

override func viewDidLoad() {
super.viewDidLoad()
// Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.
}

override func didReceiveMemoryWarning() {
super.didReceiveMemoryWarning()
// Dispose of any resources that can be recreated.
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView!, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int {
return 10
}


func tableView(tableView: UITableView!, cellForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath!) -> UITableViewCell! {
let cell: UITableViewCell = UITableViewCell(style: UITableViewCellStyle.Subtitle, reuseIdentifier: "MyTestCell")

cell.text = "Row #\(indexPath.row)"
cell.detailTextLabel.text = "Subtitle #\(indexPath.row)"

return cell
}


}

There are a few issues with this. The first is that you will see in our two tableView functions we are appending ! to several parameters.

The interface around this has changed so you need to remove these bangs.

The second issue is that UITableViewCell now has what is known as optional chaining. When querying properties that are known to possibly return nil they should be asked for with a question mark.

Finally, you cannot just call .text on a UITableViewCell anymore, you need to go through textLabel? first.

This makes my completed and working code for those two functions to be;


    func tableView(tableView: UITableView, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int {
        return 10
    }
    
    func tableView(tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
        let cell: UITableViewCell = UITableViewCell(style: UITableViewCellStyle.Subtitle, reuseIdentifier: "MyTestCell")
        
        cell.textLabel?.text = "Row #\(indexPath.row)"
        cell.detailTextLabel?.text = "Subtitle #\(indexPath.row)"
        
        return cell
    }

I really hope this helps other people that are struggling to work with very useful but slightly out of date tutorials.

I have uploaded my finished project to Github if you want to have a look. The main file that I was editing is the viewController.

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Quick Semantic Wins http://tosbourn.com/quick-semantic-wins/ http://tosbourn.com/quick-semantic-wins/#comments Sun, 18 Jan 2015 17:17:09 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2486 Trying to make the jump from not really caring about semantics in your website to doing it 100% correctly can seem like a massive and daunting undertaking. It doesn’t have to be, with baby steps you can slowly get a feel for certain things that you can learn off which will get you on the […]

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Trying to make the jump from not really caring about semantics in your website to doing it 100% correctly can seem like a massive and daunting undertaking.

It doesn’t have to be, with baby steps you can slowly get a feel for certain things that you can learn off which will get you on the way to using semantic elements and attributes correctly.

This is by no means a comprehensive list of things but like I say, just some good starting points.

Some HTML elements and attributes to be aware of

HTML5 has been the standard for some time now and has pretty much full support amongst the browsers, there are a host of great new elements that really help to define content better than a plain old <div> can.

Here are four common things that will be on your website at any given time that often are not semantically marked up.

  • Your navigation areas should be a <nav>, this isn’t just limited to the menu at the top of your screen but could be in your footer or even a paragraph of text whose soul purpose is to aid you in navigating to other areas.
  • Captioning an image should be done with <figure> and <figcaption>, in fact captioning anything should be captured in this way.
  • When citing something it is best practice to include the quote within <blockquote> and within that include the citation inside <cite>
  • When accepting numbers in a form use <input type="number" /> this has the added effect of allowing people to use the up and down arrows to increment and decrement their choice.

Some Schema to be aware of

I am a big fan of schema.org, it has been adopted as the standard for several semantic tools including Google when it visits and scrapes your site for content. Here are some of my most used schemas.

Some ARIA roles to be aware of

ARIA roles are to be used when the meaning of an element isn’t self evident. For example before we had the <nav> element you could have used <ul role="navigation"> to say that this was a navigational element.

Here are some of the more common roles that you can use without too much additional thought.

  • If you have a search form on your site you should mark it up with <form role="search">
  • If you have an alert appear on screen that doesn’t require any additional input from the user you should mark it as such. <div role="alert">
  • If for some terrible reason you have a carousel on your website (don’t have a carousel on your website) you should mark it up with <div role="marquee">

A quick disclaimer at the end!

If you view the source of this page I am likely making some of the mistakes which I have said should be avoided – this site is on my list of things to fix!

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Accessibility and SEO are tightly linked http://tosbourn.com/accessibility-seo-tightly-linked/ http://tosbourn.com/accessibility-seo-tightly-linked/#comments Sun, 18 Jan 2015 14:51:32 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2484 It is interesting that making a website accessible is often left to the last iteration of design before ‘go live’. This is a bad idea and something I briefly mentioned during a recent book review. SEO is also something that is left until the very end of the process, normally after go live when people start […]

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It is interesting that making a website accessible is often left to the last iteration of design before ‘go live’. This is a bad idea and something I briefly mentioned during a recent book review.

SEO is also something that is left until the very end of the process, normally after go live when people start to notice that their site isn’t number 1 in Google for “generic, highly sought after term”.

It is a shame because both of these things are very important for very different reasons and crucially a lot of the things you will do to try and make your site accessible will also help with SEO and a lot of the stuff you do for SEO will help to make your site accessible.

There are two main reasons for this.

Both practices require you to think of your user first and foremost

Answering questions like “Would someone without prior knowledge understand this section”, “Does this menu layout make sense”,  and “Will someone know where this link is taking them” will help make your site accessible because you are thinking about how people are going to access your site.

It is going to make your site more SEO friendly because these are the types of things search engines care about, that is keywords, site structure, and anchor text.

Both practices ensure your code helps to explain the content

Following good technical practices like ensuring you are using the correct elements to present your data to the browser and adding supplementary information when the element alone isn’t enough will make your site more accessible because assistive technologies can role with these and help present your site to your user in the best possible way for them.

It is going to make your site more SEO friendly because this type of rich data can really help add context to your content. If you mark up your pages correctly then search engines have a much easier time categorising and presenting that information to their users.

Specific examples of SEO and Accessibility walking hand in hand

Here are some specific examples of what typically is talked about in one camp or another but actually applies to both.

Alt Tags

I heard first about alt tags as an accessibility tool because they describe an image to someone who cannot see or understand the image.

Crucially machines also have a hard time understanding images, so describing them really helps search engines out when understanding what all the content on your page is talking about.

This also means that images that are purely decorative shouldn’t have alt tags, this means screen reading software won’t attempt to read them out and search engines won’t care about them (win win).

Text Equivalents

Building on the alt tag theme is the fact that if you have say an audio file on your page common accessibility thinking would be you should have a transcript of the audio available for folk who can’t hear, or are using a device that can’t play audio.

Search engines also can’t hear very well and often people will remember snippets that someone has said but not the contextual keywords. A transcript is easily read and indexed by search engines and will help people find your site.

Using clear language

Describing things in their simplest form and writing in a way that is easy to read is a massive accessibility win. The language you are writing in may not be the readers first language, they may have a disability which makes reading hard or maybe they are on a device which isn’t really designed for reading.

When people search for things they normally try and search using clear and simple terms, if you are writing in those terms there is a good chance you are going to be ranked highly for them.

Don’t use CSS to present content or meaning

This means it doesn’t matter if you like the style of your H3, you should only ever use it when you are actually describing a third level heading. It also means that you don’t just colour a deleted bit of content red, you mark it up as such.

Keyboard users who skip between headings will thank you as will colourblind users. Of course so will search engines because they don’t care about CSS they just care about the markup on your page.

Making sure URLs are readable and logical

I had always considered this to be a purely SEO driven decision because search engines care so much about the content that resides in the URL.

The accessibility win is that a clearly laid out URL is better for everyone. If someone can look at your URL and deduce the content of the page they are going to feel happier about clicking on it and more sure of their decision.

Wrapping up

Hopefully you agree with me that a good deal of what is good for SEO benefits accessibility and what is good for accessible design is good for SEO.

If you want to read more about my thoughts on SEO for developers, I recently wrote about what every web developers should now about SEO, it touches on a lot of the points I have raised here.

You should also take time to read the W3C Web content guidelines, this is where I got most of my accessibility points from.

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My thoughts on Nuu http://tosbourn.com/thoughts-nuu/ http://tosbourn.com/thoughts-nuu/#comments Sat, 17 Jan 2015 15:44:01 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2475 One of the things we have been working on at Rumble Labs is a project called Nuu. I have been meaning to write a post for a while about how useful I have genuinely found it. Nuu is a platform to allow you to discover and share new places to check out, they could be shops, bars, […]

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One of the things we have been working on at Rumble Labs is a project called Nuu. I have been meaning to write a post for a while about how useful I have genuinely found it.

Nuu is a platform to allow you to discover and share new places to check out, they could be shops, bars, restaurants or things like tech co-working spaces. The core thing is that they are new places, our weighting system for what order we show stuff to people in reflects this.

So, things first. I probably do need a more clear disclaimer, I work as a developer for Rumble Labs and have worked on Nuu. Naturally I have a vested interest in seeing it succeed.

That being said, I actually remember telling Steven when Nuu was first being worked on that someone like me would not be a user of the site. I thought the idea of finding and sharing new things was boring and that places like Facebook and Twitter that I already used would highlight anything worth checking out.

Turns out I was wrong to dismiss Nuu in those early days and I have become a heavy user of the site outside of work hours.

Features I really like about Nuu

There are three features that I really love about Nuu which I will talk about in turn.

Email Notifications by City

There are a few different ways you can set your email notifications up (including not having any, if you wanted).

The way I have mine set up is that I get one daily notification if anyone has added a new place in London to check out and I get a weekly digest of anything in London opening up in the week ahead.

What I love about these is that they are completely passive – I don’t have to do anything to find out about cool stuff to check out. And when the email comes in it is super quick to scan, open up the things I might be interested in and ignore the rest. There is incredibly little time investment in it.

Being able to add stuff to a to visit list

When the emails come in and I click into a few cool sounding places I can easily mark them as somewhere I want to visit, this adds them to a to visit list.

What I love about this list is the very second you are chatting with someone about where to go on Saturday or what to do tonight, you have a place where you have been adding cool places to check out.

Better yet, if your friend is on Nuu and they have been adding places to check out why not suggest somewhere you know they want to go? Such an easy way to make decisions!

Commenting on stuff

The final feature I like is commenting on stuff, this is hardly a ground breaking bit of technology but one of the problems you might have with checking out a new place is that it might be terrible, or it might have potential but for the first month might have teething problems.

These niggling thoughts can either be confirmed or ignored easily by seeing if people have commented positively or negatively on something.

The fact you can @mention folk in comments is great as well, it means you can actually discuss a place right there on the page. This is a relatively new feature that was added but already you can see great conversations happening between folk.

Places I have found because of Nuu

Here are some places I wanted to call out as great things I would never have known about if it wasn’t for Nuu.

  • Den Udon – I love noodles and want to check this place out
  • The Black Chapel – A great sounding coffee place
  • BunnyChow – South African food served in bread bowls
  • Draughts – A place to drink and play games

The future

So that was my post on things I really love about Nuu.

It isn’t really my place to be announcing any thoughts or plans for the future on my personal blog but one of the great things about this being such a young project is that if you wanted you could make a difference to what this projects grows into.

Any comments left here I will filter back to the folk in the office and you can always get in touch on our Facebook or Twitter pages.

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How I am using Omnifocus http://tosbourn.com/using-omnifocus/ http://tosbourn.com/using-omnifocus/#comments Sat, 17 Jan 2015 14:15:20 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2467 For the last month or so I have been using Omnifocus as my main task manager and organiser, I have been getting an absolute shedload of value from it and I wanted to share why I think it is great and how I am using it day to day. As I have only been using […]

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For the last month or so I have been using Omnifocus as my main task manager and organiser, I have been getting an absolute shedload of value from it and I wanted to share why I think it is great and how I am using it day to day.

As I have only been using it a relatively short while, take my exact methods with a pinch of salt, I hope the main takeaway from this post is that Omnifocus is very powerful and adaptable.

Why I decided to try Omnifocus

Along with some glowing recommendations from folk I know who use it I have heard nothing but good things about it from Merlin Mann on his Back to Work show. He is a big advocate of GTD and talks about how Omnifocus fits well with it.

I too am a big fan of GTD and have loosely been trying to follow it for some time. Since deciding on trying Omnifocus I have been re-reading the Getting Things Done book and have seen some massive parallels between how Omnifocus is set up and what David Allen suggests.

I don’t feel qualified to boil down the essence of GTD into a blog post as reference. Doing a quick search for terms like “gtd in a nutshell” seems to bring up some decent articles.

How I use it

If someone says something to me that I need or want to remember and I am on my computer I just hit CTRL+ALT+SPACE which opens up a quick enter task and I will put in whatever it was. This could be something like “Toby, could you pick up some milk on the way home”.

In the example above I could also add a context to it to say I am at the shops and I could add due time to the task so that I am reminded when I am likely to be near the shops.

If there is something bothering me but it isn’t urgent I will log that too. An example could be “Tidy up desk at work”. With something like this the time it is done isn’t important but the location is very important so I have a context of Work which is geolocated to my office. What this means is that I won’t be reminded I wanted to clean my desk when I am anywhere other than at my desk.

This is huge, why would you want to remember to do something when you are powerless to do anything about it.

Finally I use it for both short and long term projects. I am borrowing the GTD definition of project which is anything that will require more than one physical action to complete. These could be things as well defined as “Plan for meeting with X about project Z” or as loose as “Get in shape”

Features I love about Omnifocus

  • You can defer tasks until a certain date – there is no point in being reminded you need to download your end of month sales report when it isn’t the end of the month.
  • You can geofence tasks – like I mentioned above, you can be reminded of tasks when you are in a physical location where you are able to act on them.
  • The iPhone and Mac apps work really well together
  • You can have sequential projects – If you can’t do Y until X is completed there is no point seeing Y yet. This means you only see the next actions, not all actions of which most are pointless.
  • There is a forecast view for things with a due date coming up – This links in with your Google Calendar which enables you to plan your day really well.

Things I need to improve upon

The main thing I need to improve upon is navigating around the app, there are plenty of keyboard shortcuts that would make me more efficient and allow me to focus on completely the tasks instead of tending to them in the app.

I need to work on the consistency of how much information I capture along with any task. Sometimes I will set things like the context I want the task to be in, the time estimate and some notes. Other times I won’t include any of that information – which weakens the use of that information if I don’t apply it consistently.

Finally, Omnifocus has the notion of perspectives, these are views into the task you have. For example one of the few I have set up is “waiting” which lists all the tasks which I want to keep tabs on but are out of my control. So if I am writing a blog post which needs input from someone, whilst it is out with them for feedback I will move it into waiting.

These are super powerful and I have only scratched the surface of what I could be doing with them, I plan to do a lot more in the future.

Do you use Omnifocus?

I would love to hear what you think – Let me know in the comments or link me up to a post you have made.

 

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My Birthday Haul http://tosbourn.com/birthday-haul/ http://tosbourn.com/birthday-haul/#comments Sun, 11 Jan 2015 23:12:33 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2442 Later this week is my birthday, a combination of my wife not being able to hold her water and the fact I won’t get to open stuff on my birthday means that I got to open my presents tonight. I was also lucky enough to receive my birthday present from my mum early because it […]

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Later this week is my birthday, a combination of my wife not being able to hold her water and the fact I won’t get to open stuff on my birthday means that I got to open my presents tonight.

I was also lucky enough to receive my birthday present from my mum early because it was being posted to my flat.

So happy with the haulage that I wanted to write about it!

Here is what Elaine got me

  • Light up USB lead for my Raspberry Pi
  • An LED Light matrix for my Raspberry Pi
  • Some blue beer (had a glass, it is bloody blue as you will see in the pictures later!)
  • An Unt mug
  • An amazing card
  • A 3Doodler
  • An egg-squarer
  • Batman – Death of the Family
  • Some God is Dead comics I was missing

My mum got me an amazing laptop bag.

Best wife and mum ever! (If you buy me a present you will also be the best person ever, you cannot be my wife or mum though).

Here some pictures!

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A 3Doodler!! For making 3D things out of plastic
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Lovely laptop bag my mum got me!
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Blue Beer
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My first attempt at a cube using the 3Doodler!
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My Unt mug!
An e
Batman – Death of the Family
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Blue beer is blue
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PiGlow for the Raspberry Pi
2015-01-11 22.46.13
An Egg Cuber
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Amazing Birthday card!

 

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What the header element can be used for http://tosbourn.com/what-the-header-element-can-be-used-for/ http://tosbourn.com/what-the-header-element-can-be-used-for/#comments Sun, 11 Jan 2015 12:39:27 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2437 You might be thinking – obviously it is for the header of a page or section, end of article. It isn’t. I didn’t really think there were other uses for it until a conversation on Twitter with Derek Johnson last December. I asked “What is the most semantic way to markup a tldr; section in […]

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You might be thinking – obviously it is for the header of a page or section, end of article. It isn’t. I didn’t really think there were other uses for it until a conversation on Twitter with Derek Johnson last December.

I asked “What is the most semantic way to markup a tldr; section in HTML? aside? Is it just a paragraph of text?”

And he replied over two tweets

<header> or <footer>, <header> is for introductory content and <footer> is for information about the parent section(ing root).

Thanks so much for that slap of semantic goodness Derek!

So, lets dig into this a bit more.

The spec talks about the <header> as

The header element represents introductory content for its nearest ancestor sectioning content or sectioning root element. A header typically contains a group of introductory or navigational aids.

And goes on to note

A header element is intended to usually contain the section’s heading (an h1–h6 element), but this is not required. The header element can also be used to wrap a section’s table of contents, a search form, or any relevant logos.

So what these are saying is that whichever section we are in we can use <header> to denote any introductory content. As their note says, normally this is the heading, but it could really be anything you need to be introductory.

The upshot of this is that perhaps we could be marking up things like tldr; and short introductions better. I can certainly see a case where assistive technologies might decide to deprioritise content held within there in favour of the meat of the article.

Unfortunately at the moment if you are a WordPress user like me your hands are pretty tied as this isn’t something offered out of the box or by any plugins I have found, but certainly something to consider if you have full control over your content.

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