Toby's Ramblings http://tosbourn.com The personal blog of Toby Osbourn Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:25:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 Advertising in China http://tosbourn.com/advertising-china/ http://tosbourn.com/advertising-china/#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:25:07 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2199 If you know someone who lives and works in China I would definitely suggest trying to find local companies to help, these are going to have the best rates and be able to help you within your niche. If you don’t then you are stuck with looking from the outside in, which can be a […]

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If you know someone who lives and works in China I would definitely suggest trying to find local companies to help, these are going to have the best rates and be able to help you within your niche.

If you don’t then you are stuck with looking from the outside in, which can be a tough enough job when you have a language and cultural barrier to contend with, along with the fact that China has its own equivalents for things like Google and Facebook.

For general purpose advertising these are the three sites that kept coming up in my research, they are all big companies and generic but unfortunately they are the only ones who seem to care about selling to non-chinese advertisers.

http://www.adsage.com/agency - Probably the biggest Ad Agency in China, have partnerships with Baidu

http://www.tencent.com/en-us/ps/adservice.shtml - Owner of a huge Chinese portal

http://ad.sohu.com/ - Another huge portal in China

Feel free to comment with any you have come across!

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Get the name of a Ruby class http://tosbourn.com/get-name-ruby-class/ http://tosbourn.com/get-name-ruby-class/#comments Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:04:45 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2194 Earlier today I wanted to get the name of a class in Ruby. The reason I needed this was because I was grabbing an object that was polymorphic so I didn’t really know what I was dealing with. Here is how I did it with some help from ActiveSupport; my_object.class.name.demodulize my_object is the object that […]

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Earlier today I wanted to get the name of a class in Ruby.

The reason I needed this was because I was grabbing an object that was polymorphic so I didn’t really know what I was dealing with.

Here is how I did it with some help from ActiveSupport;

my_object.class.name.demodulize

my_object is the object that I was unsure about.

Calling class on it returns a Class object.

Calling name on that object returns the name of the class.

Calling demodulize is a nice way of removing any modules that happen to be before it (I didn’t need the module information and most of the times you won’t).

If you don’t want to rely on ActiveSupport you can do;

my_object.class.name.split('::').last

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Belfast Bloggers 3rd Meetup http://tosbourn.com/belfast-bloggers-3rd-meetup/ http://tosbourn.com/belfast-bloggers-3rd-meetup/#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 21:59:20 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2181 In the spirit of being a ‘Belfast Blogger’ I guess I should write down some thoughts on my first time attending the Belfast Bloggers meetup. It took place on 22nd July at Farset Labs. I left before the end, but it was an excellent night so I figured I would pen some thoughts. The format […]

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In the spirit of being a ‘Belfast Blogger’ I guess I should write down some thoughts on my first time attending the Belfast Bloggers meetup. It took place on 22nd July at Farset Labs.

I left before the end, but it was an excellent night so I figured I would pen some thoughts.

The format originally was three talks, pizza, then group discussion. As it turned out we had two talks, pizza, the end of the second talk then onto the third and final talk before the group discussion.

Disclaimer

Sorry to all the real writers and bloggers out there that are reading this – I am a developer but I do try!

Dawn Baird

Dawn Baird talking about BloggingFirst up was Dawn, after asking everyone in the room to do a brief intro and discuss what they wanted to learn about blogging she took us on a tour of some of the questions we should be asking ourselves to see if we should even be blogging in the first place.

Assuming we should be blogging (I think it is safe to say everyone there was up for it!) she talked us through the basics of what you would need to get set up both technically and in terms of how you should be thinking about generating content.

What I found most interesting about her talk was when she discussed how controversial headlines whilst not brilliant for SEO can generate discussion and clicks. A more newspaper like approach. This is something I have always stayed clear of (maybe because my WordPress SEO plugin shouts at me!).

Willis McBriar

Willis McBriar on VideosNext up we had Willis who talked about the use of video online.

The talk started off by citing some stats about the future of video on the web, the gist of it being it has nowhere to go but up.

Next on the agenda was talking about video editing tools, Willis believes that the future of video creation is cloud based editing solutions (One such service was We Video). This makes a lot of sense since a lot of us are generating content on machines that may well struggle with intensive video editing tasks.

The final section of his talk was on the problems with turning videos interactive – with blog posts we can have links, comments, sharing options, all that good stuff, videos have none of that unless embedded into a page that has that. Of course you could let a bunch of hackers loose on your video.

Joel Kerr

Joel Kerr talking about his blogging journeyLast but by no means least we had Joel. Joel spoke of the different projects he has been involved in and continues to work on and what he has learnt throughout his journey.

I really enjoyed his talk, he mentioned needing to stay genuine to yourself, how he treats social media and blogging as part of the same thing and perhaps most importantly for me he mentioned that if you aren’t writing about what you care about you probably won’t see it through.

This resonated with me and immediately made me remember all the dead blogs I have created and half finished projects. In the future I need to make sure I am fully invested in the idea and not just the execution of an idea.

My apologies for the poor picture of him, I wasn’t sitting in a brilliant spot to snap a pic! To make up for it I will include a bonus picture of one of his slides!

Social media does not happen by accident

Pizza!

Here is a picture of just some (it all wouldn’t fit into one picture) of the pizza that was kindly donated by Four Star pizza.

2014-07-22 19.35.41

Twitter Role Call

Just for folk that attended or interested in those who attended, here are the twitter accounts of the folk that were there. Sorry if I have missed you out, just comment and I will add you!

Me, Dawn, Willis, Joel, Belfast Bloggers, Andy, Andrew, Adam, Ellie, Megan, Alan.

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My face – on a stamp! http://tosbourn.com/face-stamp/ http://tosbourn.com/face-stamp/#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:00:38 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2169 For the last couple of weeks Elaine has been getting more and more excited about a present that was arriving for me. Today, it arrived! A rubber stamp of my face! Amazing! I brought it in to show the Rumble ones, here are the results;   Thanks to Niall, Mark, Melissa, and Clark for the art! The […]

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For the last couple of weeks Elaine has been getting more and more excited about a present that was arriving for me.

Today, it arrived!

A rubber stamp of my face! Amazing!

I brought it in to show the Rumble ones, here are the results;

2014-07-22 10.53.06


2014-07-22 10.55.02

toby_horse

 

upload

Thanks to Niall, MarkMelissa, and Clark for the art!

The stamp was bought from Stamp Yo Face – amazing stuff!

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Review: Raspberry Pi Server Essentials http://tosbourn.com/review-raspberry-pi-server-essentials/ http://tosbourn.com/review-raspberry-pi-server-essentials/#comments Sat, 19 Jul 2014 17:07:27 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2163 This is now the third Raspberry Pi book I have reviewed, I feel like I am becoming a bit of an expert! Raspberry Pi Server Essentials, written by Piotr Kula focuses on taking your Pi and treating it like various types of server, for example a Web Server, a Media Server, a Game Server, things […]

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4696OS_Raspberry Pi_covThis is now the third Raspberry Pi book I have reviewed, I feel like I am becoming a bit of an expert!

Raspberry Pi Server Essentials, written by Piotr Kula focuses on taking your Pi and treating it like various types of server, for example a Web Server, a Media Server, a Game Server, things like that.

The ‘essentials’ part of the title eludes to how in depth we go into each of these servers, not very – which for a short book is 100%. I was able to read through this book in a very small space of time, which again I like!

At times when reading it I kind of felt like the projects weren’t necessarily Pi specific, but you could do them on a Pi. At the end of the day the Raspberry Pi’s operating system is just Linux so this does make sense but if I am going to buy a book on cool server stuff to do with my Pi, I would rather it be about things that are uniquely suited to such a small machine.

It is very clear from reading this book that Piotr knows what he is talking about, when he does dig deep he writes in a way that only an expert of the subject matter could write.

I would recommend this book to someone who maybe has a Pi and it thinking of quick and easy things they could use it for.

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Review: Raspberry Pi Robotic Projects http://tosbourn.com/review-raspberry-pi-robotic-projects/ http://tosbourn.com/review-raspberry-pi-robotic-projects/#comments Sat, 19 Jul 2014 16:08:48 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2160 Today I am going to review the Kindle Edition of Raspberry Pi Robotic Projects. As I am sure you have guessed this is a book about robotics projects you can do with your Raspberry Pi. It is written by Richard Grimmett. I was going to write up a little blurb about Richard but I couldn’t find anything […]

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4322OT Raspberry Pi Robotic ProjectsToday I am going to review the Kindle Edition of Raspberry Pi Robotic Projects.

As I am sure you have guessed this is a book about robotics projects you can do with your Raspberry Pi. It is written by Richard Grimmett.

I was going to write up a little blurb about Richard but I couldn’t find anything on him with a basic internet search and in the book it was weird that there was more about the reviewers than there was the author, maybe he is a man of few words when it comes to himself, luckily he has plenty to say about the Raspberry Pi!

I have decided to do a chapter by chapter review of the book, let me know if you find this way interesting or if you would rather I reviewed books as a whole in future.

Setting up the Pi

I thought this was useful even though by this stage I have set my Pi up about 7 million times (give or take) and assumed a lot less than some of the guides I have read online.

I thought it was weird that for downloading WinSCP the reader was asked to search for it and download it, for things like PuTTY the links were given.

An introduction to programming in Linux

Again I thought the lack of assumption was good and the basic Linux commands were exactly what I would expect.

Personally I thought it was very weird that different text editors were mentioned that Emacs was chosen, maybe I am just biased as a Vim user but if Nano is on the machine it is a much easier text editor for completely new folk to pick up, and if you aren’t completely new you probably have a text editor of choice.

I did enjoy how Richard explains things like file extensions being a bit different between operating systems, it shows he has really tried to get into the head of someone who doesn’t use Linux frequently.

I think Python is an excellent choice of programming language for new folk so was glad to see this was what was being offered for the first programming example.

I enjoyed reading the really brief introduction to basic language constructs, I thought however that maybe introducing Object Orientated code was maybe a little premature if we are assuming folk have only just started programming as of this book.

Next up we look at some C++, I am a complete C++ newb so this was very interesting to read through. I am glad the basics were explained but they didn’t completely go through the previous example again.

Our first real project, getting speech input and output sorted

Unfortunately I don’t have access to any of the hardware that this book requires at the moment so I couldn’t follow any of the guides through.

One thing I thought was a bit odd that when mentioning extra stuff to buy there was no hint of good places to look online or model numbers if you wanted to use what the author had used. I understand though that this might localise the book too much.

The instructions for doing everything were clear and there was good use of images and screenshots throughout that you could refer to.

I loved the approach of getting us to try different things in different stages, it was like capturing input, check, showing output, check, without worrying about how anything interacts together.

I find this is a much nicer way to explain something because the reader isn’t lost until the final step.

Giving your RaspberryPi vision

I love that we are almost going through a robot’s senses, we have given it hearing and speech, and now we are going to give it vision! This is the type of stuff I dreamed about doing when I was a kid.

One thing I noticed reading through this chapter is a lot of the apt-get stuff is repeated, this is excellent because the author knows that most of us will flick through a book and start hacking on stuff as soon as we hit something that interests us.

I was actually talking to my boss about OpenCV the day before I read about it in this book, that is the library that we use in this chapter to let our Raspberry Pi  look and reason via a webcam.

Lets make our Pi move!

We have given our Pi sight, hearing, and a voice, naturally the next stage is to give it movement.

This chapter starts getting very hardware focused as we put wheels on our Pi, again though great effort has been went to to ensure that everything is well documented and there are plenty of photographs to follow.

Wheels are for losers

This chapter teaches us how to make our Pi walk, with legs. If you want to make your Pi walk (why the heck wouldn’t you?) then you really should consider buying this book!

Enough said!

Adding sensors to avoid things with the Pi

This is starting to hit the limit of what I would feel happy hacking on and understanding, which means this is where the real fun starts!

I love that because of Richard’s writing style even complicated principals seem manageable.

Creating a remote control for the Pi

Now we have a Pi that can move about it would be great to be able to control it, in this chapter we are shown how to do this, there were a lot of new tools in here for me and I learned a lot.

ZigBee is one example of this, I had no idea of this standard before reading this book.

Finding our Pi

Now that we can make our Pi move and control it wirelessly there is every chance we could lose it, luckily in this chapter we learn how we could attach a GPS device so we could track our Pi.

Bringing it all together

Like I mentioned before, Richard has written each chapter in a  way that you didn’t need to build upon previous chapters, which I like but now we are some way through the book we take pause to bring everything we have learned together. This is where we are shown the best way to get different parts talking to each other via ROS (Robot Operating System, something else I hadn’t heard of before.).

More movement!

Remember when I was super excited about getting our Pi to walk? Yeah screw that. Now we are using our Pi to control boats, helicopters and submarines! What a way to end the book!

Wrapping Up

As you can likely tell by the length of this review, I really enjoyed this book. If like me you used to dream about making your own robot then I can highly recommend picking up this book and having a play!

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Packt Publishing http://tosbourn.com/packt-publishing/ http://tosbourn.com/packt-publishing/#comments Fri, 18 Jul 2014 22:06:01 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2156 If you have visited my site for any length of time you will know that I have had quite a few dealings with Packt Publishing. I wanted to write up a quick post explaining why that is the case! I reviewed for Packt Publishing A very long time ago I was contacted by Packt Publishing […]

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If you have visited my site for any length of time you will know that I have had quite a few dealings with Packt Publishing. I wanted to write up a quick post explaining why that is the case!

I reviewed for Packt Publishing

A very long time ago I was contacted by Packt Publishing by the always friendly Kenny Dias to write a review for Mastering Redmine. At the time I was using Redmine a lot and felt I would be in a good position to offer up my thoughts.

I was given access to the book on their site and I enjoyed the process of reading and reviewing the book. Kenny seemed to like how responsive I was and continued to offer me books. I only ever picked books that I felt I would be able to provide a fair review for. As someone who loves to read tech books it was a complete win win and I was super happy to continue with this arrangement.

If you are interested the reason I was approached it because I blogged about Redmine, not even in that much depth or frequency but clearly enough to be noticed by someone!

I wrote for Packt Publishing

Unrelated (I think) to my reviewing work that I was continuing to do for Packt Publishing I was writing about some issues I was having with Bootstrap’s Typeahead functionality. Again the blog post was read by someone at Packt and I was contacted to see if I would like to write a book about Twitter’s Typeahead project.

By the way, if you are seeing a theme about blogging increasing your luck surface area, you are right, I have written about how good things happen to those who blog before and stand by it.

I reviewed again for Packt Publishing!

I was actually still writing the Typeahead book when I was asked if I wanted to review some things again, and due to an administrative blip when my book was out I was asked if I wanted to review it.

If you are interested I would have given it 5/5 :-)

I didn’t think they would ever want me to write again, I was honoured to be asked the first time but figured they wouldn’t want to do it again. Once my book was out I started reviewing their content again.

I *almost* wrote again for Packt Publishing

Some time later I was contacted to see if I wanted to write a much bigger book for Packt Publishing, for some reason someone in there liked me and thought I did a good enough job to see if I wanted to write a 300 page book on jQuery.

Initially I jumped at the chance but had to let them down pretty early in the process. I have depression and unfortunately shortly after accepting the wonderful task of writing this book my depression took a bit of a turn for the worst and I knew there was no way I was going to be able to deliver anything even slightly good for them.

I continue to review for Packt Publishing

Amazingly Packt didn’t sever all ties with me after that and to this day I still review for them, I am sure they will never ask me to write again for them but to be honest I am happy to keep on reviewing their amazing catalogue of content.

Disclaimer

I get no money for reviewing these books, and I am never coerced into writing something positive I don’t believe in.

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Why thinking small helps create software that lasts. http://tosbourn.com/thinking-small-helps-create-software-lasts/ http://tosbourn.com/thinking-small-helps-create-software-lasts/#comments Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:53:05 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2147 Last year I attended the Dublin Web Summit, among some of the excellent talks were two by Chad Fowler and Fred George. I wanted to share them here and talk about why they are important. Fred George on Micro-Service Architecture This video is from Baruco in 2012, but the content is pretty much identical to […]

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Last year I attended the Dublin Web Summit, among some of the excellent talks were two by Chad Fowler and Fred George. I wanted to share them here and talk about why they are important.

Fred George on Micro-Service Architecture

This video is from Baruco in 2012, but the content is pretty much identical to what was at the conference I attended.

In this talk Fred walks us through his learnings and thought process over many years as he attempted to implement Micro-Service architectures at various companies.

If you are not sure what a Micro-Service is don’t worry, the video explains it very well, but if you want to read up a bit more on it I can recommend this post.

One of the conclusions was that around 100 lines is probably enough for most services, at this size rewrites become trivial and testing loses priority. There is only so much damage you can do in 100 lines of code.

One of the other conclusions was that if you have an architecture of potentially hundreds of tiny services is that integration testing starts to lose priority, a better solution is to monitor business metrics. If sales start to drop of a particular product it might be an indication that something isn’t performing as it should be.

Having such small services allows for developers to more easily pick the correct tool for the job, the services are decoupled so you could easily write one thing in Ruby and another in Node.

Chad Fowler on Disposable Components

Just like Fred’s talk, this video isn’t from the conference I attended but is a recording of an almost identical talk by Chad. This video is from Rails Israel in 2013.

The first portion of this talk by Chad explores why long lasting systems (think Unix and tools of that ilk) last and concludes that it is because they have small replaceable parts.

Chad draws similarities between the likes of classic cars and the human body, individual parts (cells) can be replaced constantly, but the sum of those parts remains.

The second portion goes into some rules that he has introduced at this company, for their detail watch the video but I will summarise their headlines here;

  1. Comments are a design smell
  2. (Unit) Tests are a design smell
  3. The System is heterogeneous by default.
  4. Code has to be “this” big.
  5. Nodes (servers) are disposable.
  6. Never upgrade software on an existing node.
  7. After you deploy a system, throw away the keys to it.
  8. Always be deploying.
  9. Assume failure.
  10. Monitor everything.
  11. Experience your worst case scenario so you don’t have to fear it.
  12. Data should be as small as possible.

I want to quote from the talk;

If your services are so small that you can read them in one go, you probably don’t need a test.

I think this is very powerful. If you start to refactor things to make them so small that you can understand their function in one read, you are surely testing the underlying language more than business logic.

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Today I launched a book. http://tosbourn.com/today-launched-book/ http://tosbourn.com/today-launched-book/#comments Sun, 13 Jul 2014 18:50:20 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2124 A small book, but a book, my book, my first self-published book. It took me 18 calendar days start to (almost) finish. I wanted to share with you what I did and what learnt along the way. I Wanted to Write Step zero was that I had a real itch to write something, ever since […]

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A small book, but a book, my book, my first self-published book.

It took me 18 calendar days start to (almost) finish.

I wanted to share with you what I did and what learnt along the way.

I Wanted to Write

Step zero was that I had a real itch to write something, ever since I turned down an offer to write a jQuery book for Packt I have had a feeling that I wanted to get something down on paper again. I am not sure everything else would have panned out as quickly if I didn’t have the desire to write something.

I Didn’t Want to do much Research

Like I say, I wanted to write, I didn’t want to research a load of stuff. That isn’t to say I don’t like research or that I didn’t research stuff for the book, but it is to say that research wasn’t the itch I wanted to scratch. So I thought about what I already knew about. The topic that came to mind was making websites pay for themselves.

I have been making websites do that for years so I figured I knew a thing or two.

I Cracked Open Writer Pro

This was probably a mistake, but I started writing using Writer Pro, it seemed like a good idea but it came up short in a couple of areas.

Not being able to add page breaks was a bit of a blocker.

Not being able to add a table of contents seemed like an odd thing to be missing.

I Wrote, and I Wrote, and I Wrote some More!

I outlined the book very quickly and got an idea for what I wanted to take the reader through, how to work out how much you are spending, how to limit that spending, how to increase money made, and how to track it all. Over the course of about three days I completed the bulk of the copy.

I put a Page up to Capture email Addresses

Using this blog as the home I quickly created a contact form that would allow someone to enter their name and email address. I promised to only email them the once and shared this page on social media.

This was perhaps a bit of a mistake, because the email came into my inbox and I had to manually copy and paste their name and email address into a Google Drive spreadsheet. Next time I would probably use a Google Form to handle this for me.

I asked for Feedback

One of the folk who sent in their interest was someone I worked with, I decided to ask if he would mind reading an early version of the book when it was complete. He was able to spot some daft errors I had made and provide feedback on what he felt was a fair price.

I self Edited

After some time away from the book I read it as a reader might, and made some more changes based on what I found – it is really surprising how many odd sentences you find even in a paragraph you have read dozens of times before once you have had some time away.

I Read APE

Some might say this should have been something that I undertook before writing a book, but then my itch would’t have been scratched.

APE is a book that tackles the issues with self-publication, I skimmed it and then read in depth the chapters that were applicable to my situation.

I Edited some More

APE opened my eyes to a lot of things I was potentially doing wrong, I made a list of all these things in Wunderlist and went through them one by one. Some of the items were;

  • Inconsistent capitilisation of headers.
  • Ignoring the Oxford comma.
  • Coming up with a publishing house name.

I Designed a Front Cover

coverI am not a designer, but I think I did a pretty good job, I wanted to make the title and the image clear and easy to read when viewed as a thumbnail on somewhere like Amazon.

I used Adobe Kuler to try and make sure I didn’t make any terrible colour choices.

The image is the money symbol created by Font Awesome.

I Bought Pages

As I mentioned, Writer Pro didn’t really cut it so I bought Apple’s Pages to do the final editing on. I exported the markdown file to a docx which I was able to read in Pages.

The reason I went for Pages and not Open Office is that I figured there would be a cleaner route to creating an ePub file from Pages, since Apple have iBooks. The reason I care about that is because it seems that the easiest way to create a mobi file which is what Amazon likes is to convert an ePub file.

I Fought with Pages

I could do everything I needed but I had to learn some things, like how to update the body copy for each bit of text that uses that ‘style’ and how to remove the numbers from a Table of Contents.

I made my ePub

After the fighting I was able to successfully create a file that looked nice when viewed in iBooks, one of the biggest things I had to watch out for was that iBooks hides the Table of Contents in a button, so you need to make sure your book will look OK without one.

Another thing was some hard returns after page breaks were adding blank pages into the ePub file, I had to manually remove these.

I made my mobi

I used a program for the Mac called Calibre that is excellent at converting ePub files into mobi files. Almost the complete set!

I made my PDF

The final filetype I wanted to support, a good old PDF, I just exported this straight from Pages.

I signed up with Amazon KDP

Kindle Direct Publishing is the programme they have for selling Kindle eBooks, the process was pretty straight forward.

I had to go through and prove I wasn’t eligible for US tax and then I went through the process of uploading my book and associated cover. It took about one hour to accept the book and about 3 hours to get it on all of Amazon’s various sites. (UK, US).

I installed Easy Digital Downloads for WordPress

I didn’t want to rely on Amazon selling the product and wanted to sell it direct through my blog, so I shopped around and found Easy Digital Downloads. It seems to work fine although my caching plugin did mess up one persons order, but I think this is because I didn’t empty the cache after making changes.

You can test it yourself if you like by buying my book here!

I emailed the Kind Folk who wanted to Know

I sent everyone a quick email explaining that the book was now live and directing them to a page where they could go and get a copy.

What is Left?

I want to design and code up a one pager that will act as a more permanent home for the book.

I want to write some articles that will hopefully entice people into checking out the book – basically free articles along the same themes as the book.

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Removing “Protected:” and “Private:” from WordPress posts http://tosbourn.com/removing-protected-private-wordpress-posts/ http://tosbourn.com/removing-protected-private-wordpress-posts/#comments Sun, 06 Jul 2014 13:30:16 +0000 http://tosbourn.com/?p=2093 By default WordPress will prepend the copy “Protected: ” to any post title that is protected by a password and will prepend the copy “Private: ” to any post title that is set as a private post. I can see the sense in doing this, in a lot of cases you want to clearly mark […]

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By default WordPress will prepend the copy “Protected: ” to any post title that is protected by a password and will prepend the copy “Private: ” to any post title that is set as a private post.

I can see the sense in doing this, in a lot of cases you want to clearly mark those posts as such. In my use case though I am helping theme a site for a photographer, and all his client photos are password protected, in this case having the extra “Protected” copy just looks ugly.

Happily there is a really simple fix you can apply to kill this wording, add the following snippet to your theme’s functions.php file.


function protect_my_privates($text){
  $text='%s';
  return $text;
}
add_filter('private_title_format','protect_my_privates');
add_filter('protected_title_format', 'protect_my_privates');

What this does is tells both private_title_format and protected_title_format that we just want to pass through the title and not append or prepend anything to it.

If you did want to do something special to the text you could always edit $text to be something like;


$text = '[protected]%s[/protected]'

This will make a title that is called “Hello World” appear like “[protected]Hello World[/protected]“

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